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10 Poisonous Plants For Dogs

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10 Poisonous Plants For Dogs

A huge number of common garden and household plants are toxic to dogs.

Toxicity reactions range from mild to life-threatening.

Dogs are very curious creatures.

The combination of a greedy appetite, natural inquisitiveness and unselective taste can lead to trouble for our best friends.

poisonous plants for dogs

The symptoms related to plant poison are the following:

toxic plants for dogs

All these clinical signs are linked to toxicity, if you dog presents some of them you should take him to the veterinarian because it may be poisoned. You can also call the

You can also call the ASPCA animal poison control center for help. It is on service 24 hours a day. Call (888) 426-4435 (a fee may be applied).

The 10 plants listed below are known to be poison to dogs. The toxicity varies

The toxicity varies according the amount ingested and the specific variety of the plant.

My advice:

If you suspect your dog has ingested any of the plants below, call your veterinarian straightaway. Do not wait to see if the symptoms listed above appear.

Here’s the list of toxic plants for dogs:

1. Sago Palm

Cycas Revoluta is very poisonous to dogs. The seeds contain the largest amount of toxin. The eating of one or two seeds can result in very grave effects, such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

The seeds contain the largest amount of toxin. The eating of one or two seeds can result in very grave effects, such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

The eating of one or two seeds can result in very grave effects, such as: vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • depression
  • seizures
  • liver failure
sago palm - plants toxic to dogs

Photo by Paige Filler (Flickr)

2. Narcissus bulbs

The bulb portions of Narcissus contain toxins that can cause: gastrointestinal irritation, drooling, anorexia, depression of the central nervous system,

  • gastrointestinal irritation
  • drooling
  • anorexia
  • depression of the central nervous system
  • convulsions
  • cardiac alterations
Narcissus bulbs

Photo by thebittenword.com (Flickr)

3. Azalea/Rhododendron

Rhododenron spp. contains substances named grayantoxins, which can induce:

  • vomiting
  • salivation
  • diarrhea
  • weakness
  • depression of the central nervous system
Severe poisoning can ultimately lead to coma and death from cardiovascular collapse.

Alazea

Source: Flickr

4. Oleander

Nerium oleander contains cardiac glycosides that have the potential to cause:

  • gastrointestinal tract irritation
  • abnormal heart function
  • hypothermia
  • death
Oleander

Photo by Swaminathan (Flickr)

5. Castor Bean

Ricinus communis holds ricin, a highly toxic protein that can cause: severe abdominal pain, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, faintness and loss of appetite.

  • severe abdominal pain
  • drooling
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • excessive thirst
  • faintness
  • loss of appetite
Castor Bean

Photo by Steve Slater (Flickr)

6. Cyclamen

Cylamen species are rich in cyclamine.

The highest concentration of this toxic molecule is typically located in the root.

This toxic can induce intense vomiting. Dead has been reported in some cases.

Dead has been reported in some cases.

Cyclamen

Photo by Peter Stevens (Flickr)

7. Amaryllis

Amaryllis species are common garden plants. They contain toxins that can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain,

They contain toxins that can cause: vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia and tremors.

  • vomiting
  • depression
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal pain
  • anorexia
  • tremors
Amaryllis

Photo by liz west (Flickr)

8. Autumn Crocus

Ingestion of Colchicum autumnale results in: oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ failure and bone marrow destruction.

  • oral irritation
  • bloody vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • shock
  • multi-organ failure
  • bone marrow destruction
Autumn Crocus

Photo by Manu (Flickr)

9. Pothos

Pothos belongs to the Araceae family. If chewed or ingested can cause significant mechanical irritation and edema of the oral tissues and other organs of the gastrointestinal tract

If chewed or ingested can cause significant mechanical irritation and edema of the oral tissues and other organs of the gastrointestinal tract.

Photos

Photo by Quinn Dombrowski (Flickr)

10. English Ivy

Also known as branching ivy, sweetheart ivy and California ivy, Hedera helix holds triterpenoid saponins that can result in: vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation and diarrhea.

  • vomiting
  • abdominal pain
  • hypersalivation
  • diarrhea
English Ivy

Photo by Aaron Gustafson (Flickr)

You should choose carefully the plants you have in your home and be sure they are well out of your dog’s reach.

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By | 2016-12-16T21:42:51+00:00 October 16th, 2015|Article, Toxic Foods|Comments Off on 10 Poisonous Plants For Dogs

About the Author:

Dora Mancha
Hi! I'm Dora Mancha, DVM. I am graduated for the Veterinary Medicine Faculty of Lisbon (2009). My degree is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). I completed my degree in Veterinary Medicine in July, 2009. Over the first years as a veterinarian my work was closely related to the animal health field. I have gained some average experience having worked in Barcelona University (UAB) Equine Hospital and by working with veterinarians in Portugal. In addition, in 2009 - 2010 I was in Madrid at the University Alfonso X el Sábio doing an internship in the equine service. I am also very interested in small animal medicine and surgery. In fact I worked in several small animals clinics in Portugal improving my knowledge about small animal behavior and health. Dogs always have been present in my life, since I was a child. At the present moment I have four dogs a Labrador, a Epagnheul Breton, a Whippet and a mixed breed dog.